stop buzzing around.

Archive for the ‘Writing Tips and Instruction’ Category

Elizabeth Gilbert on Nurturing Creativity

Also check out Elizabeth’s Thoughts on Writing on her website.

(Now for the hilarious confession….I just realized I posted a link to this talk already.  I guess it’s that good!!  If you missed it the first time, here’s your chance.  Enjoy!)

What’s a Bloggiesta?

blogiesta Bloggiesta is the brainchild of Natasha over at the Maw Books Blog.  It’s a chance to spend the weekend catching up on your blog.  Tidying up loose ends, get ahead on posts, participate in hosted mini-challenges and learn some great blogging tips along the way.  And would I forget to mention….prizes!

Best of all it’s not too late to start!  Although officially it runs from 8am Friday the 19th through 8am Sunday the 21st.  You can still jump in and get plenty of blogging done.  I’m getting in with a slow start myself!

Just run over to Maw Books and get yourself setup.

Ready, set…blog!

Today’s Writing Prompt

Write What you DON’T Know.

 

question-mark

 

Using the first person, describe an event or action you are fairly sure you will never experience firsthand. Be very specific-the more details you incorporate the more likely it is that your  reader will belive you.  Include your feelings and reactions.

 

(excerpt from What If: Writing Exercises for Fiction Writers by Anne Bernays & Pamela Painter)

Follow that blog….

If you aren’t reading literary agent Nathan Bransford’s fabulously informative blog you really are missing out!  Bransford, an agent for Curtis Brown LTD out of  San Francisco offers up top tips and insight for writers. Want to know how things really work in PubLand?  Stick around for his straightforward insider’s look at the publishing industry.

Today’s Writing Prompt

Here are some of the ways your characters will lead their inner lives.  With their imagination they will:

characterinnerselftable

Take one or two and run with them….see who you find!

(adapted from What If? : Writing Exercises for Fiction Writers)

Catch This Article! Sarah Rees Brennan on Inspiration

The fabulous gals at Book Smugglers have an amazing author chat online now with the adorable Sarah Rees Brennan , author of the highly acclaimed Demon’s Lexicon.

“And yet, even now, those heroes are compelling. The Big Three started a Tall Dark and Handsomely Withdrawn movement that shows no sign of faltering more than a century later. I wanted to portray a guy like that unflinchingly, taking him apart from the inside out, and still… with luck… create a character who compelled readers.”

demons-lexicon-196x300

Run on over there and check it out now…I promise you won’t be sorry!

Oh, and did I mention she’s giving away Demon book swag along with great writing advice?

That’s right another contest, this time one you’ll actually enjoy the process of entering!

Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully – in Ten Minutes, by Stephen King

I. The First Introduction

THAT’S RIGHT. I know it sounds like an ad for some sleazy writers’ school, but I really am going to tell you everything you need to pursue a successful and financially rewarding career writing fiction, and I really am going to do it in ten minutes, which is exactly how long it took me to learn. It will actually take you twenty minutes or so to read this essay, however, because I have to tell you a story, and then I have to write a second introduction. But these, I argue, should not count in the ten minutes.

stephen-king

II. The Story, or, How Stephen King Learned to Write

When I was a sophomore in high school, I did a sophomoric thing which got me in a pot of fairly hot water, as sophomoric didoes often do. I wrote and published a small satiric newspaper called The Village Vomit. In this little paper I lampooned a number of teachers at Lisbon (Maine) High School, where I was under instruction. These were not very gentle lampoons; they ranged from the scatological to the downright cruel.

Eventually, a copy of this little newspaper found its way into the hands of a faculty member, and since I had been unwise enough to put my name on it (a fault, some critics argue, of which I have still not been entirely cured), I was brought into the office. The sophisticated satirist had by that time reverted to what he really was: a fourteen-year-old kid who was shaking in his boots and wondering if he was going to get a suspension … what we called “a three-day vacation” in those dim days of 1964.

I wasn’t suspended. I was forced to make a number of apologies – they were warranted, but they still tasted like dog-dirt in my mouth – and spent a week in detention hall. And the guidance counselor arranged what he no doubt thought of as a more constructive channel for my talents. This was a job – contingent upon the editor’s approval – writing sports for the Lisbon Enterprise, a twelve-page weekly of the sort with which any small-town resident will be familiar. This editor was the man who taught me everything I know about writing in ten minutes. His name was John Gould – not the famed New England humorist or the novelist who wrote The Greenleaf Fires, but a relative of both, I believe. (more…)

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: